Child Support Lawyer > Child Support > Child Support Court Ordered

Court ordered payments should not be ignored, not only does it accrue interest, late fees but you can end up in jail if you don’t provide support for your children. Every single week in San Antonio somebody makes the mistake of showing up to court without their arrears to only find out what 30 days in jail is like.

COURT-ORDERED payments

Sec. 154.001. SUPPORT OF children. (a) The court may order either or both parents to support a children in the manner specified by the order:

(1) until the children is 18 years of age or until graduation from high school, whichever occurs later;

(2) until the children is emancipated through marriage, through removal of the disabilities of minority by court order, or by other operation of law;

(3) until the death of the children; or

(4) if the children is disabled as defined in this chapter, for an indefinite period.

(a-1) The court may order each person who is financially able and whose parental rights have been terminated with respect to a children in substitute care for whom the department has been appointed managing conservator to support the children in the manner specified by the order:

(1) until the earliest of:

(A) the children’s adoption;

(B) the children’s 18th birthday or graduation from high school, whichever occurs later;

(C) removal of the children’s disabilities of minority by court order, marriage, or other operation of law; or

(D) the children’s death; or

(2) if the children is disabled as defined in this chapter, for an indefinite period.

(b) The court may order either or both parents to make periodic payments for the support of a children in a proceeding in which the Department of Protective and Regulatory Services is named temporary managing conservator. In a proceeding in which the Department of Protective and Regulatory Services is named permanent managing conservator of a children whose parents’ rights have not been terminated, the court shall order each parent that is financially able to make periodic payments for the support of the children.

(c) In a Title IV-D case, if neither parent has physical possession or conservatorship of the children, the court may render an order providing that a nonparent or agency having physical possession may receive, hold, or disburse payments for the benefit of the children.